Part Two - Page 1

  1. The operations of the mind are produced by two parallel modes of activity, the one conscious, and the other subconscious.
  2. The subconscious' logical processes are carried on with an absolute certainty and regularity. Our mind is so designed that it prepares for us the most important foundations of cognition.
  3. The subconscious soul, like a benevolent stranger, works and makes provision for our benefit, pouring only the mature fruit into our lap; thus ultimate analysis of thought processes shows that the subconscious is the theatre of the most important mental phenomena.
  4. It is through the subconscious that Shakespeare must have perceived, without effort, great truths; that Phidias fashioned marble and bronze; that Raphael painted Madonnas and Beethoven composed symphonies.
  5. Ease and perfection depend entirely upon the degree in which we depend upon the subconsciousness; playing the piano, skating, operating the typewriter, the skilled trades, depend for their perfect execution on the process of the sub-conscious mind. The marvel of playing a brilliant piece on the piano, while at the same time conducting a vigorous conversation, shows the greatness of our subconscious powers.
  6. We are all aware how dependent we are upon the subconscious, and the greater, the nobler, the more brilliant our thoughts are, the more it is obvious to ourselves that the origin lies beyond our ken. We find ourselves endowed with tact, instinct, sense of the beautiful in art, music, etc., whose origin or dwelling place we are wholly unconscious.
  7. The value of the subconscious is enormous; it inspires us; it warns us; it furnishes us with names, facts and scenes from the storehouse of memory. It directs our thoughts, tastes, and accomplishes tasks so intricate that no conscious mind, even if it had the power, has the capacity for.

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